Core Competencies

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Good morning, all!

I thought this might be an interesting discussion. If you were given the ability to draft an Information Governance core competency​ for employees within your company, what would be your top requirements and metrics? Thinking in a perfect world, doesn’t matter the level of employee – the core competency would be applicable to any level.

Thanks!

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Susan Gleason CIP, CRM, IGP
Manager, Information Governance
Shipman & Goodwin LLP
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I would say awareness in all of the areas below, competence in a few, and mastery of at least one.

Records & Archives Management, Information Management, Litigation Preparedness, Information Privacy, Security

ARMA published a Core Competencies book that would be worth a look.

Records and Information ManagementCore Competencies,2nd Edition

I would also look at competency guidelines from the other disciplinary areas listed above. For example, IAPP for information privacy, our own AIIM for guidelines on the knowledge areas of an information professional, et. al.

Norman Mooradian | Sr. Solutions Analyst

Enterprise Content Management, BIS

Konica Minolta Business Solutions

Direct: 714-688-7753

nmooradian@…

Helpdesk Email: ECM.Support@…

Helpdesk Phone: 800.362.8772, option 1 for software

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Susan,
I have created a blog post on my site that is my suggestion of a starting point adapted from something that was created in my past.  You can access it here.
When you read it, you will probably notice that the only mention of anything related to records management is the email management item.  And even there, in the training we developed, we consciously avoided the term ‘records management’.  We even avoided ‘retention’ and stuck to ‘safekeeping’ to lower the intimidation factor.  And the absence of anything else RM-related was very much by design and driven by the fact that we tried to manage records determination at as system level as much as possible.  As we (the intelligent information management pros that we are) know, IF you can actually create and maintain an IA, the metadata associated, a registry (programmatically connected or not), sensitivity labels, IAM/Security/Permissions, and address the beast that is email, having records determined by the software is much easier.
Probably not surprising that email management was, by a fair margin, the most difficult to teach and maintain ��.
Hopefully this helps a bit, Susan

Sincerely,


(sent via webmail)


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It is an interesting question because IG can be seen as a super-discipline, with mastery of one of its areas a pre-requisite. That is how I characterized it in my first sentence.  So the idea of a general competence is a challenge, since it would require competence in at least a few of the areas, e.g., records management, data privacy, an eDiscovery. I would probably shoot for some basic awareness (perhaps that is what you mean). In which case I would write a training that introduces employees to basic records concepts, privacy concepts, eDiscoverey, ECM, etc. I would use some basic documents to build the training (ARMA’s principles, the Generally Accepted Privacy Principles, etc.). Then I would identify some performance criteria to demonstrate competence. For example, being able to distinguish records from non-record documents; being able to identify PII and understand handling rules, etc.

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[Norman] [Mooradian]
[Sr. Solution Analyst]
[KMBS, Inc.]
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Norman,
Great comments.  In my experience though (and ONLY from that lens), I would have to say that the majority of those items are simply too complex, and nowhere NEAR interesting enough, for the very large majority of people in most organizations.  For example, just getting some folks in facilities management to truly get a handle on what metadata is, how the metadata standard defines, describes, and controls it, and how to apply it took 2, two-hour workshops.  And RM wasn’t even MENTIONED ��.

Sincerely,


(sent via webmail)


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Yes, that is why I shy away form using the term competency for end users in the larger organization. I have, however, been asked to include an overview of records and public record request procedures as part of larger ECM project trainings. The goal was to provide some governance fundamentals prior to designing and implementing an enterprise ECM solution. So you do some whats and hows around records, public records law, ECM in general, and so on.

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[Norman] [Mooradian]
[Sr. Solution Analyst]
[KMBS, Inc.]
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Susan,
In my opinion, you should accommodate, or at least consider, the latest thinking/knowledge regarding how we, as people think, judge and decide – “Thinking Fast and Slow” by Daniel Kahneman (Nobel Prize winner) is the book.  He provides a framework to enable identification, assessment and change design of behavior patterns toward a desirable state (competence) regarding a domain (ex: IG).  A “group perception” of desirable and undesirable outcomes and an awareness regarding our tendencies toward faulty decision mechanisms become gradually common place. By this approach, the “IG minimum standard” then becomes a set of (judge-decision) rationales which are exercised by the IG professional at every opportunity in which an undesirable IG risk (as probability x negative impact) is “perceived.”  It’s worth a shot as an approach for changing groups toward competency.

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Pedro Correa
Sr Business Development Mgr, Americas
Papyrus Software
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