Archive system recommendations

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Presently, our organization which is an industrial bank, is moving off back up tapes.  We have never had an archiving tool to perform content searches and apply auto retention/disposition.  Other than Enterprise Vault, what other recommendations would anyone make and why?

Much appreciated,
Lorelei

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Lorelei Chernyshov, CIP, IGP
Merrick Bank
Assistant Vice President, Information Governance
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Lorelei,

To clarify you’re looking for an RM system rather than a true long term archiving solution, correct?
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Correct.

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Lorelei Chernyshov, CIP, IGP
Merrick Bank
Assistant Vice President, Information Governance
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OK, to make suggestions that make some sort of sense, what order of magnitude budget?  And how many users?  And do you have a current document management platform that the RM capability needs to integrate with?
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Hi Lorelei,

There are no lack of choices, but some will be better than others for your organization…but I don’t really know your organization…yet  🙂

User need..Legal Requirement…Business Process Integration and integration with other LOB systems all come in to play.  To simply take off tape and archive is different that content search and auto retention/disposition.

In the field of RM auto retention/disposition I have found OpenText to be the most intuitive, but its expensive…I have also found it to be the easiest to integrate with other systems.
The Microsoft & O365 features for RM are getting better, but administration across a large enterprise is difficult and a constant battle.
I have been a fan of MFiles lately too, especially if you need multiple vaults for global or just multiple verticals in your business.

You can find some of the other big players in the Gartner Quadrants.  When I am trying to help a client in your position decide I also like to browse across some of the G2 (G2.com) articles, but some of the opinions there are terribly polarizing and misleading…lots of folks either ‘drinking the koolaid’ or have a bone to pick with a vendor.

Long story short is you have a very cool journey ahead of you!
You may want to engage some help with a High Level Analysis (HLA) so you can feel very confident about your choice.  Reach out if you would like to chat.

Cheers,
-Rick

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Richard Molique
ECM Consultant
IQ Business Group, Inc.
804-614-6445
rmolique@…
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Richard,

Lorelei and I were private messaging following this and some of your comments directly reflect mine as well.  Lorelei’s organization is about 300-ish people.  While I know that there are a small handful of organizations that are in that size range that have OT, that is usually because of a specialized OT offering that is difficult to get elsewhere (if not impossible) and that, per your comment about it being very pricey, they pay pretty dearly for that capability.  And not just in terms of license costs.  More so in implementation, training, and ongoing operations costs.  Which is unfortunate, especially since the intro of OT 16 where OT finally solved their biggest adoption hurdle with the simplified (role based) UI.

And I definitely second your assertion to start with an analysis.  Even if an organization has an initial ‘short list’ driven by other considerations in their IT landscape, executive preferences, or other factors, at least as a way of ‘validating’ the candidates in the short list.
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Hi Lorelei,

I have worked with customers that were moving off from traditional storage media (i.e. tapes, network drives) to modern platforms, such as Office 365.

With file protection (backup/restore), auto-classification and retention, and content search in mind, we often come across the need for a WORM compliant solution and built-in OCR capabilities, especially for scanned PDFs. Do you see your organizations also have these requirements too? Feel free to give me a shout if you like to chat!

Cheers,
Tom

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Tom Ng
Regional Sales Director
Collabware
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My office uses Laserfiche and we have been very impressed with the limitless options that are now open to us, however, I don’t know what options are out there for banks.  There may already be some solutions created and build specifically for your industry.

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Connie Prendergast
Records Management Clerk
Flagstaff County
Sedgewick, AB CANADA
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Laserfiche harkens back to its lineage from microfiche, the basis of the now defunct “Image” or “Imaging” for one of the “I”s in AIIM.

Data storage is now part of “the cloud” which has its root in white board marketing, where “your computers” are sketched on one side of the white board, and “our computers” are sketched on the other side, and the path between the two is irrelevant so a squiggly area is sketched: this squiggly sketch looked so much like a cloud that the name stuck.

This “cloud” of course is based on dimly lit rooms of data racks of server computers. Today, we’re blessed with server cards that hold a massive amount of data each. There’s an effort to achieve a petabyte of storage per card, 10 cards per server, and 10 servers per rack; that’s A LOT of data storage! Enough so, that companies can have their own private, secure server clouds.

I still kind of like imaging as one of AIIM’s “I”s, and Laserfiche captures can be digitized and nicely stored in the aforementioned petabyte cards.

But that may get into digital twins; too far off subject.

-Val

VAL VONHEEDER  |  Principal Engineer

Northrop Grumman Corporation  |  Aerospace Systems


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We’re finishing the build out of a custom solution for a customer which migrates records to locations with restricted read access on network attached storage and is indexed via SharePoint (2019 in this case) for searchability.

They decided that the cost profile for managing their images was going to be much better storing the records on network attached storage and using a tool like SharePoint to manage search ability.

Rob

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Robert Bogue
President
Thor Projects LLC
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Lorelei – These are great recommendations and I’ll add two more that we’ve found useful with organizations in your situation. We don’t have any dogs in the fight – we don’t sell or implement anything.
1) In your analysis — your essential first step — definitely investigate whether you’re amenable to SaaS and cloud-based options — either from the software vendors with good cost-effective archiving for your situation (e.g. Hyland, Laserfiche) or from pure SaaS vendors that provide great archiving and RM (ViewPointe, Access). OT provides Archive Center and the acquired AppXtender (which is like Hyland or Laserfiche), in either onsite or offsite flavors. But Archive Center is likely overkill for you and AppXtender has significant product risk for the long term.
2) In your solution evaluation be sure to assess integrator-software pairs. In our experience, ECS has done a good job with Laserfiche in the western US in archiving and RM situations. Xerox (really!) has done a good job with Hyland archiving and RM in the western US. These are just examples. But the point is that a great services provider is often at least as important as the software doing the archiving. Sometimes of course the software provider may be adequate for services, but you may not get the A-Team.

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Richard Medina
Co-Founder and Principal Consultant
Doculabs Inc.
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Hi Lorelei, if you are looking for long-term preservation of information that does not require ongoing access and is not affected by the obsolescence of technology vendors and products, I recommend that you explore the alternative for data storage and digital preservation in film that PIQL offers

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Elisa Garcia-Morales
Information and Records Management Consultant
Inforarea, Madrid- Spain
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Lorelei

I would recommend that  you look at NetApp Snaplock, Nexsan, or KOM as they are not only long term storage technologies but also working on developing the final ISO 18759 trustworthy storage sub-system standard which would give you the long term confidence along with data trustworthiness and reliability due to the methodologies being implemented.  The tools suggested by  others are not engaged with this standard so i would urge caution on those other tools.  I hope this helps,

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Robert Blatt, MIT, LIT, CHPA-III
Principal Consultant, Electronic Image Designers (EID).
AIIIM Fellow #175
Chair, Trustworthy Storage
Chair, Trustworthy Document Management & Assessment
Chair, ECM Implementation Guidelines
ISO Convenor: 18829, 18759, 22957, 18759)
US Delegate to ISO TC/171
TC/171 Liaison Officer to TC46 SC11
TC/171 Liaison Officer to TC/272
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