AIIM19 — Recommendations

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Great seeing so many of you last week! Definitely appreciated the energy and insight. While things are top of mind, I’d like to share back with the full member community favorite insights picked up while at AIIM19. 

What presentations were your favorites? 
Any ah-ha moments during the roundtables? 
Anyone take a pre-con class you’d recommend to others? 
What was your favorite brain date? 

Let’s try to get a number of AIIM19 insights in this post. Let’s not lost the energy we ignited last week! 

For my recommendation–definitely check out @Laura Downey from TSA IIM strategy framework templates. Attaching pictures here, but hopefully she can upload a doc of the templates she created for further use. 

What did you learn? 

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AIIM 
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 First, the conference is planned and organized perfectly, you guys definitely know how to put on an event.  

The benchmarking opportunities at the roundtables and braindates are invaluable.  

I found someone who uses the same ECM system and we had a great braindate.  

In addition, the expertise at AIIM is so diversified.  

If I needed to find someone with website design experience (which I did) it was readily available.  

So my favorite things this year included: 

 1) AIIM App 
2) Roundtables 
3) Braindates 
4) Food  

There were so many great takeaways from the presentations and round tables. My favorite was Alan Pelz-Sharpe’s Blockchain for IM round table. I am fascinated with how I could use blockchain for our permanent records, and his information was on point. I did not realize everyone uses templates on the IBM Cloud in Hyper Ledger to create the blockchains – I thought there would be fancy coding involved. (I bet there is somewhere down the line.) 

 It may sound cheesy, but the whole conference was very empowering. I will be at the next one for sure.

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Members 1st Federal Credit Union
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I concur with Devon. I attended two roundtables held by Alan Pelz-Sharpe and both were invaluable to me.  The conference had a really great “culture,” it was easy to network and make connections. I also found the attendees to be diverse in their areas of expertise which brought a lot of value. 

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Red Deer County 
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Great to hear! @Devon McCollum and @Emily Speight–save the date – May 16 at 11am ET — @Alan Pelz-Sharpe will be our guest in the VIP lounge talking about practical uses of AI for intelligent information management. Hope you can join us! 

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AIIM
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Loved the Braindates… great opportunity to meet people with similar issues up close and personal. 

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Bank of Canada
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Some of the very best things that I experienced this year (in no particular order)  The WIIM: What’s this all about was great in that it brought to light some things that many take for granted including: “Why have a WIIM?” finding answers to that question was an exercise in thought that i really enjoyed. 

Writing Effective IIM & IT Policies presentation was amazing. I had not really viewed them through the lens of language choice being punitive and seeing that was incredible and definitely made an impact on what I’ll be doing going forward. 

During the Improve Collaboration with MS 365 I had a few moments where I gained clarity. Thank you to all the participants in that round table. 

 I had intended to make more braindates than was feasible but the one that stuck out in my mind was focused on what the future of RIM/IIM as a profession looks like and what skills are needed as we move forward. 
The party Wednesday night was very well thought out and I loved being able to give back to the greater communities with the care package packing. 

For those planning to attend in 2020:  
If you’re new try not to be overwhelmed and it’s okay to not make EVERY session that’s amazing. 
If you’re returning:  
Definitely make a braindate, some of the proposed questions would have been fantastic.
It’s ok to create one if you don’t have the answer. 
Look at the breakdowns and descriptions – Having a deeper dive round table of a previous presentation is amazing. 
Looking forward to seeing you all next year.   

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WATERONE 
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You wouldn’t know where I could get the Writing Effective IIM & IT Policies presentation would you?  I’m in Australia and couldn’t travel to the event, but i’m really interested in the right language for change management and exec buyin 

Angie 

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National Health and Medical Research Council 
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AIIM will be sharing the ‘best-of’ sessions with members through our upcoming Virtual Events. Once I know the line up, I’ll be sure to ping you here to let you know which virtual event not to miss! Thanks for your interest.   

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AIIM
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Hi, 
I have some material that I had prepared for client — it’s a IG framework for developing policies.  If you are interested please email me at amitabh@….  

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HELUX
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Amitabh, 
Perhaps you would be open to sharing it generally? 

 

 Hi Amitabh: 
I would like to have a look at it, too. Could you please post it or send it to me? 

Thanks, 

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Members 1st Federal Credit Union 
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Hi Amitabh,
I would be interested in that as well.  

Best Regards, 

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Chiny 
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Hi,  
I gave a presentation a couple of years ago at a SharePoint Saturday conference regarding an approach to developing an IG framework — the types of policy instruments, relationship to other policies, audiences for different policy instruments, etc. While the presentation was geared for a government audience, many of the points apply equally to the public and private sector.  Below is the link.  Please reach out to me if you have questions.

 www.spsevents.org/city/Ottawa/Ottawa2017/Lists/SPSSessions/Attachments/32/Amitabh%20SPS%20Ottawa%202017%20IG%20Policy%20Framework%20FINAL.pdf  

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HELUX 
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I recommend that people exercise caution with the traditional framework used by governments/large business, if it follows the spectrum model (Policies > Directives > Standards > Guidelines, etc.). Those old-style frameworks are exactly what I worked with for 15 years in federal government in Canada, and that’s one of the reasons I went into this field: to fix the problems in that framework. 

That spectrum-style framework ignores a fundamental distinction in policy writing: the distinction between documents that set rules and documents that restate them. You can see the distinction clearly in the image attached. 

A good policy instrument sets rules and contains only rules that it sets. Guidance documents, on the other hand, restate and explain rules that are set in other documents, as well as recommended procedure, best practice, or just old-fashioned good advice. 

The strict distinction between column 2 and column 3 is recognized in many domains, even though they use other terms to describe it: 

Law: Statute/Regulation vs Legal Authorities (or Commentaries) 
Library Science: Primary Sources vs Secondary Sources 
Religion: Scripture vs Commentaries  

In all cases, a document in Column 2 carries far more weight than a document in Column Three.  

To be valid, a rule need only appear once in the entire collection of Column 2 documents. That rule can then be repeated, explained, and expanded many times in different documents in column 3.  

The primary division of any framework, therefore, has to start by recognizing the distinction between those two types of documents. The spectrum approach is defensible when it’s clear in which column each type of document fits. We run into trouble if a document type seems to straddle columns two and three, and the blurring of that line is the source of much confusion in the policy writing world.  

You’ll find more about this distinction and its importance, in the How to Write Rules that People Want to Follow pdf that I posted here last week.  

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Perfect Policies 
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Awesome post, Lewis!

Even if “fixing gov’t” sounds like climbing a string of spaghetti to the moon, LOL!

 

There are far too many laws, policies, and directives in narrative format and far too few actual performance plans and reports in open, standard, machine-readable format, like StratML Part 2 (formerly ANSI/AIIM 22:2017). 

Fixing government may seem like an impossible challenge. However, significant progress can be made when agencies comply with the new Foundations for Evidence-Based Policymaking Act, including Title II, the OPEN Government Data Act, which directs agencies to make government information open and machine-readable by default, using standardized schemas specified by SDOs.  

While section 10 of the GPRA Modernization Act already requires agencies to publish their strategic and performance plans and reports in machine-readable format, the opportunity exists for AIIM to help agencies prioritize other records series to be made machine-readable. 

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StratML Community 
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Thanks Amitabh. 

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IIS Inc.
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 The session that I gave was really just a brief overview of my approach to policy writing, specifically, breaking the pattern of negativity around most rules documents. I show people why policies are more effective when worded in a positive and helpful manner.  At the roundtable session following that presentation, I gave away a couple dozen copies of my book, How to Write Rules that People Want to Follow: A Guide to Respectful Policies and Directives.  

The softcover edition is available from Amazon, Barnes & Noble, and many other bookstores, but I’m happy to provide the PDF here for anyone who wants it. 

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Perfect Policies 
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Attachment(s) Respectful Policies 2.1 with cover.pdf  

For me the braindates were wonderful – it’s so rare to find an “impartial” peer to peer learning environment and I can’t emphasize how valuable that is. Generally being around like minded people in similar situations was powerful.  Greg Verdino’s keynote was so relevant and well presented and was a highlight me. 

Kudos to the AIIM app designers – the notifications, the scheduling capability… it was a vital tool and so helpful during the event.  

In 2020 even more braindates!  

Thanks @Jessica Lombardo and co for an awesome event! 

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A&W Food Services of Canada Inc.
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 The best thing about AIIM Conferences is the ability to share, discuss, and learn from so many brilliant individuals.  So, to follow John Daly’s lead; my favorite things this year: 

1) Roundtables 
2) Ability to visit with peers 
3) AIIM App 
4) AIIM Pool Party  

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BlueWater Federal Solutions 
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Hi everyone,  
I’m late to the party – I definitely want to share some of my aha moments! The AIIM conference was inspiring and rejuvenating for me professionally and personally – thank you to everyone who worked hard to make it happen.  

I loved @Michael Moon ‘s session: How Neuroscience can Solve Cybersecurity Problems. Change management/user adoption is my favorite challenge of IM work so this session was right on point for me. I had more than one aha moment in this session; the one that stands best on its own is this: “The psychological and physical safety of stakeholders is key to any successful change.” This takeaway directly impacted my communication plan for what I’m working on now. 
Another excellent roundtable I attended was @Dan Abdul ‘s on machine learning. Takeaways here were: 
– You need ML when there are too many variables for the human to comprehend well. 
– Judgments/subjective use cases are not good for ML.  
Thanks again for an amazing experience!  

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E-Nor
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Thanks @Elise Dunham! Would be interested in reviewing that communication plan when you’re done if you can share it!  

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AIIM
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I am going to repeat a common theme here- the braindates were a great opportunity for one on one conversation and personal connections.  As I was leaving a scheduled braindate I actually moved into another informal one organically with someone nearby who had overheard part of our conversation, which was awesome. 😊  

I also wanted to offer positive feedback for the First Timers session on Tuesday.  As one of the long-term attendees at a table of new folks, there was really a sense of appreciation at my table (and I think around the packed room) for a chance for people new to the conference to be able to meet others in the same position, get answers to some of their questions, and to break the ice.  Hopefully this session is something that AIIM continues to have at every conference in the future!  

Finally, what I always enjoy at every AIIM conference is the chance to chat with others in the IIM profession from across the world.  It is so fascinating to me to hear how our challenges and opportunities are so similar, and yet have those unique differences based on geography and culture!

 Thanks again to the AIIM team for all of their hard work! I look forward to seeing everyone in 2020!  

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Metropolitan Council 
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